Thursday, 21 April 2011

Goodbye, farewell, adios.....


And so the time has come to say adios to all of our 11C blog readers who’ve followed us daily through the most amazingly intense ten weeks of our lives. A big shout-out from me, Gerry your blogger, to all our venturers who were project communications officers and photographers for consistently bringing the blog to life from far-flung projects.

Our 11C Alpha and Delta groups successfully completed 21 projects including 7km of trail in La Cangreja Absolute Reserve in Costa Rica, rebuilt five houses damaged by hurricanes in El Rodeo, Nicaragua, and supplied 30 families with clean water to their homes in Achuapa, Nicaragua.

Now only the volunteer managers and Ross our country programme manager remain at fieldbase. The place is eerily quiet save for the occasional bark from our newly adopted dog Daz. And soon no one will be there to hear Daz’s barks.

So, this is Zero , signing off with our final sitrep for expedition 11C:


Serial Alpha: 10.00 hrs 20/04/11, over.

Serial Bravo: Fieldbase, Turrialba, Costa Rica, over.

Serial Charlie: Sunny and dry, over.

Serial Delta: On both the Alphas’ and Deltas’ last night we held The Golden Mess Tin Awards which recognise the crème de la crème of our venturers, though of course we’d have given them all an award if we could because we’ve never come across a more lively, creative and continuously surprising group.

So, final drumroll for our golden winners:

Hard Core Trekker

Alpha: Chris Hibberd

Delta:Stephan Moehrke

Entertainer/Comedian

Alpha: Andres Cambronero Rodriguez

Delta:Andres Chavarria Navarro

Most improved language
Alpha:Josseling Zeledon Bravo

Delta:Kike Lira

Romantico

Alpha: Richard Cronheim & Ellie Spicer

Delta: Jay Lancaster & Rose Ashbourn

Spirit of Raleigh

Alpha:Louise Simpson

Delta: Richard Mandell

Outstanding male

Alpha:Daniel Saborio Romano

Delta:Benny Gamsu

Outstanding female

Alpha: Emily van de Bunt

Delta: Mary McCann & Karla Arroyo Chaves


Our final changeover is finished. Our venturers have flown the nest. Deep clean of fieldbase is done and dusted, over.

Serial Echo: Get on the party bus to Cahuita beach. Carnage guaranteed, over.

Serial Foxtrot: None. All admin completed, over.

Serial Golf: Risk assessment update – now very high. 36 volunteer managers about to be unleashed on an unsuspecting Caribbean coast, over.

Serial Hotel: There won’t be a next time. This is it. Pura Vida! 11C Zero, listening out...

Wednesday, 20 April 2011

Delta Yankees final blog

Now it's the turn of our delightful Deltas to give us the final word on their projects and all that they've achieved.

Delta Yankee 1 
By Mags Chilaev

Completing the Turrimacho trek has been a crowning achievement for all Delta Yankee 1 venturers, ending on a beach aptly named Hermosa meaning ‘beautiful’. Before we set out on this voyage of a lifetime we were relayed terrible myths and legends of ‘pylon’ day and dizzyingly high altitudes, so in some ways the trek lived up to its expectations. Many describe it as “one big hill” and though this description is less than colorful it is no less accurate.

We stayed at 2800m for six days, ascending and descending Costa Rica at a nauseating pace, we trekked through thick jungle forests and trudged through sticky clay, occasionally stumbling upon an oasis of ‘pulperias’ (grocery stores). This shared hardship has brought us together as a group and it is good to finish Raleigh on a ‘high’.

Delta Yankee 2
By Jess Bridge-Dunk

Alex started the second part of our Momotombo trek by sitting in tomato sauce over dinner, although heart breaking for Alex, it provided great amusement for the rest of the group!

It was that same night that the school provided us with a plentiful supply of water which came as a great relief to the majority of the group who had a refreshing wash. However for myself much embarrassment ensued when the door of the washing room fell down and Chris was met with great shock and surprise. Overall, a fabulously funny day for all!

The next day was slightly less joyful as it began with a steep incline (albeit with fantastic views overwhelming us at every turn). The following day was 11km yet we finished by 11am and enjoyed an afternoon of sleep, easing pain and drinking chilled Pepsi purchased from the many local pulperias.


This prepared us for day 13 which was a 24km day with tough inclines. Indeed, at one point we climbed 200m further up over just 400m. Luckily after such a brutish day we were greeted by a kindly old Nicaraguan gentleman who offered us his solar powered living room as sleeping quarters.


The last third of our trek began with an early arrival at the school we were staying in. Rest and washing facilities meant that we began the following day in high spirits.

Such high spirits were needed however for the rest of the week as it consisted of brutally long and hot days on uneven roads. The only relief came in the form of ten minute breaks in the small amount of shade we searched high and low for.


The day before we reached the crater lake we all tasted a little bit of heaven in the form of a six hour break at a very well stocked pulperia. Excellent bread, Pepsi, cake and sleep provided enough energy for the rest of the journey which ended on a remote farm with the majority of us sleeping on a trailer under the stars.

Yet all was not idyllic for forest fires were spotted on El Hoyo which prevented us from our scheduled climb. Esmie’s birthday provided a welcome distraction from the disappointment and the arrival at the crater lake was a celebration for all to enjoy.

Our luck changed when the forest fires disappeared two days later and half the group had a day trip to the top. The best views we have seen so far made the steep climb worth it and with Volcan Momotombo to the left and the Pacific to the right we all felt a real sense of achievement.

Third phase ended in a chilled out fashion: sunbathing, swimming and relaxing by the turquoise water, eating a diet of delicious avocado and tomato sandwiches, pineapple and watermelon.


Overall a truly fantastic trek with lots of adventure and excitement, we couldn’t ask for more!

Delta Yankee 3
Goodbye Jungle and Goodbye Raleigh
By Faruk Patel

This was the last phase for everyone, and for many Piedras Blancas was their best phase on Raleigh. The highlights included………

Surviving the scare from the frogs, cockroaches, monkeys and panthers. No one is ever going to forget Charlotte’s spontaneous and hilarious reactions!
Finishing the trail, the relief was visible on everyone’s faces on the last day of work!
Having a thrilling football match in torrential rain between England and Costa Rica/Nicaragua, which England astonishingly won!

Visiting the nearby gulf coast of El Golfito and being re-acquainted with the real world.
Spending 24 hours at Jungle Camp. To everyone’s surprise, no one got eaten alive!


Catherine’s attempts at communicating with the Ranger who fell in love with her – priceless!
Who will also forget the Dutch pancakes, Enrique dressing up and of course the muscles gained from ever such hard work!


For everyone, this was the first time living in the jungle. Life here has equipped everyone with survival skills for the future. No one will forget being Tarzan for three weeks. Pura Vida!!

Delta Yankee 5
By Jasmine Henry

Our water project here in La Guaruma has continued with good progress, after digging more and more trenches in the baking heat of Nicaragua we have now also laid pipes and began fitting taps. Part of the group moved house last week to live with different families as we had originally been split across two water projects meaning we were living quite separately. Although we were sad to say goodbye to our first families after a week living with them, it is good to all be working together and we have found our new families just as hospitable. Living closer together has also allowed for night time games of charades, poker and of course ‘I Have Never’.


Our village has a small school, with just 12 people ranging from 5 to 13 years old, every day we have spent an hour teaching some basic English including ‘head, shoulders, knees and toes’’. We held sports day which involved mixed teams of venturers, PMs and children running three-legged races, hopping with balloons between their legs and dancing under a limbo stick. And we gave adult classes with the whole village fluent in no time!


Delta Yankee 5 has also been lucky enough to meet with some of the Alphas who are also working on a water project.

Together we went on a trip to the nearby town of San Juan de la May where we visited a ceramics factory, some of the town’s 26 fat lady statues and slept over in a community centre.


Delta Yankee 6 
By Benny Gamsu

This last week we took part in several activities with the community of Coroma which included a sack race. Chocolate-making lived up to everyone’s expectations and we’ve been enjoying chocolate with bananas and artisan hot chocolate since. There was just enough time for a game of musical lifejackets on our last night. It’s been a project with loads of laughs, fab food and many, many memorable moments.


Some of the things that really made this phase so enjoyable for everyone were the incredibly warm and welcoming community, the beautiful surroundings and most of all the brilliant group which really got on well, worked well together and did it all with humour and enthusiasm.


It's been an unforgettable experience and our time in the Talamanca Indigenous reserve was a fitting note to go out on.

Saturday, 16 April 2011

11C Alpha Yankees final blog!

Silence. In this case, isn't golden. Our Alpha venturers have flown the fieldbase nest. Mess tins swing limply in the wind. Birds still sing sweetly in the trees but their sound is somehow muted.

It's hard to believe that 10 weeks have flown by and our amazing Alphas have now finished the 11C expedition. But we've waved them off on their buses to San José, knowing that lifelong friendships have been made and treasuring magical memories.

So, it's with sadness but an immense sense of pride that we bring you the final ever word from our 11C Alphas...

Alpha Yankee 1
By Amy Ratcliff

Since Day 6 Alpha Yankee 1 has been through a lot, we’ve had some long tough eventful days but we made it through to the end. Day 9, Laguna Vueltas to Santa Lucia, is the day that stands out for most of us and the day that is continually referred back to. Early on in the day Jo had to leave because her knee was hurting. Organising getting her out added a three hour wait onto a day that already promised to be long and difficult. We set off in the heat and knew that a 1 km vertical climb awaited us. To say it was a long day is an understatement. What followed were moments of getting lost, scrambling up very steep hills and taking on the jungle. Thankfully Jo rejoined us three days later.


Corcovado National Park was a definite highlight of the trek when we reached it towards the end. It didn’t disappoint, a noticeably different climate from the other National Parks, filled with wildlife that when we were quiet enough we were able to see. Spider monkeys, brightly coloured parrots and deadly snakes to name a few. An unfortunate incident where a member of the group sat on a hornets nest had the group running through a section of the jungle to escape.


We were quite unlucky with the weather for the last few days, the dry season turned out to be not so dry. One night whilst camping at a ranger station, our tent inners and outer filled with muddy water and we had to flee into a small wooden room in the ranger station to shelter from the storm. Something changed as we moved along the coast and for our last day of walking and day off on the beach we had clear blue skies and bright sunshine. It made us appreciate finishing all that more. A couple at our final destination allowed us to camp in their back garden and use their facilities. Once again, like many times during trek, we were amazed by the kindness and warmth of local people. Our final beach was idyllic. We all spent a few hours there as a group, swimming in the sea and desperately trying to get rid of our t-shirt, shorts and boots tan line. Whilst swimming half the group were stung by jellyfish but even that didn’t detract from a restful relaxed last day or our group meal at a nearby restaurant – a final break from trek food!



Alpha Yankee 2
By Ed Smart

With only three days left until the beautiful beach of Playa Junquillal, Alpha Yankee 2 leave the community centre of Quebrada Grande in high spirits, which might also have been due to the fantastic Mac and Cheese dinner the night before, as well as the morale-boosting banana we had with our porridge. The ascent to Cerro Cacao ranger station from the town is steep and unrelenting, however occasional glimpses of the Pacific to the west keep our feet moving and we are treated to the breathtaking expanse that is the Cacao plateau. For many of the group this moment was one of the main highlights of the trek, the transition from baron hillside to lush green grass and striking stand alone trees was so immediate and absolute that the incredible diversity of Costa Rica really hit home. It was then that we realised how privileged we were to be there.

After the plateau we plunge into the rainforest yet again, and come across the ranger station soon after. From which we can see our final destination, many miles away yet, but all the same, being able to see the finish really highlighted how far we had come. We unfortunately were not able to reach the summit of Cerro Cacao, as we encountered a Terciopelo snake, who wasn’t too keen on sharing the trail with us so we backed away and left on our final jungle trek to the Maritza ranger station. We left our final camp at 4am to complete our 30 km final leg. The day was long, but we knew with every step we were approaching the destination we had been working towards for the past 17 days. After many kilometres, blisters and hours of walking, we round the final corner to the welcoming white sand and blue waters of the beach. As one, we take the final step onto the sand, before we sprint to the waves, shedding our boots and packs before we launch ourselves into the water.


No words can describe the sense of achievement the group felt after those final steps, after all the blood, sweat, tears (and various other bodily fluids), we had all made it, as a group of 14, through all the highs and lows of what will certainly be some of the hardest but most memorable weeks of our lives.



Alpha Yankee 3
By Freya Lemon

With just one evening remaining of our final phase we are now preparing to say goodbye to the jungle. But we’ll be doing so with heavy hearts...it’s been an exciting few weeks for Alpha Yankee 3 in Braulio Carrillo National Park.

After making ourselves at home in our very own jungle camp, we were met by our host ranger, the eternally upbeat Tenorio.


As our task was explained to us (starting where our predecessors finished, we were to gravel 320m of footpath leading through the rainforest) we realised that a tough two weeks lay ahead of us.


But through torrential downpours we walked, carrying what felt like our bodyweight in gravel along that increasingly familiar and seemingly endless footpath and...WE DID IT!!

But whilst the job in hand brought us here, it’s been everything else that’s made this experience one we’ll never forget. From our daily dips at our very own private waterfall, to celebrating Gembob’s birthday Alpha Yankee 3 style (with an 80s themed party, energy bombs and a delicious chocolate fudge brownie cake courtesy of PM Roberto of course)!


We can now relax knowing that we’ve conquered the jungle, forming lifelong friendships along the way...and it turns out it doesn’t always rain in the rainforest!


Alpha Yankee 4
By “Nana”

In the final days of our amazing project in Miraflor, we finished the beautiful path by gravelling the whole way until the end!! (yes, it was hard work). It was such a rewarding feeling putting down the last sack of gravel, you can’t even imagine how excited we were!

Now, more about our “community experience”, we got to teach very useful words such as “wallop” and memorable songs like ”poppity ping” to the local school children and had a couple of trips to Estelí, going in a really crowded and loud bus!! (because of some crazy Raleigh  people).


There is no doubt we had a great time! But, saying good bye to our families was the hardest part, with a couple of tears, we left Zacaton leaving parts of our hearts in each house.


What another great experience of Raleigh life. It's coming to the end, it's coming to the end, but what we are sure of is the fact that, we will take all of the memories with us and relive  the good moments.

…Y como dice la canción…“Conoche como vienen los de la 11C”!!



Alpha Yankee 5
By Harry Fellows and Chich

A long and emotional journey it has been, from when it all started three weeks ago meeting our new families. When we started working on the waterholes, we never thought that we’d get as far as we have. From flat ground to holes to craters that plummet beyond the eye can see, the team pulled through together to conquer San Marquena with pick-axe and shovel.


Blood, sweat, tears and laughter have been shed by individuals. As muscles bulked and skin browned in the intense heat, we carried on with the work, got deeper with the holes and found ourselves moving onto other projects. We moved down the village and started to build a water tank at a spring. Trenches were dug and pipes were laid and eventually we managed to fit four taps to houses in the lower part of the community.


Our relationships with the locals developed in such ways that some ventures really found it hard to say goodbye. On the last night speeches were made, songs were sung, tears were cried and long-lasting friends and memories were created. We felt really appreciated within the community and hated the fact that the bus journey back was inevitable.

The experience over the last three weeks has been an eye opener. We've realised just how lucky we are at home, with our access to resources. The memories the group gained from our experience in San Marquena will live with everyone in A.Y.5 forever.


On behalf of A.Y.5 we’d just like to thank everyone involved in the expedition for giving us all a truly amazing and memorable time. Final piece out from A-Town x


Alpha Yankee 6
By Camilla O’Connell

Now that Alpha Yankee 6 are all reunited back at fieldbase we have been reflecting on all the great times we had in Alto Coen. Ben and Wellard were particularly thankful that the trek and journey out of the reserve was surprisingly smooth, speedy, and hitch free – a first for us!

Other highlights included Max, Andy, Fab, and Anita playing a number of high speed football matches as part of the Alto Coen football team. Fab and Anita in the girls’ team won their match and even more importantly Max and Andy’s team reached the final, though sadly didn’t take home the champions’ title.


The ‘Raleigh Olympics’ devised by Wellard and Ben was a great way to pass the time on a lazy Sunday afternoon. After a number of different games, including the ‘rock and spoon’, ‘wheelbarrow’, and ‘obstacle’ races, Anita, Chris, and Lucia made up the winning team and accepted a much anticipated prize of some Haribo sweets – a real luxury after a staple diet of rice and beans!

Unfortunately we didn’t manage to finish the project, though it was amazing to see parts of the roof being constructed and realising just how much wood we had carried through the jungle to the worksite.


However, having returned to normality at fieldbase, and after gorging on banana splits at Pops, we all agreed that what made Alpha Yankee 6 the best phase ever was the group itself. After all the highs and lows throughout the phase, Alpha Yankee 6 remained a solid team from start to finish.

Alpha Yankee Six Rules!



And now all that remains is to leave you with our famous 11C expedition song which locals can be heard throughout many of the communities we've worked in, and will be hummed and sung by the 11C expedition for many years to come...

video

Wednesday, 13 April 2011

Delta Yankee 5- WATER!!! by Jasmine Henry


Our water project here in La Guaruma has continued with good progress, after digging more and more trenches in the baking heat of Nicaragua we have now also laid pipes and began fitting taps. Part of the group moved house last week to live with different families as we had originally been split across two water projects meaning we were living quite separately. Although we were sad to say goodbye to our first families after a week living with them, it is good to all be working together and we have found our new families just as hospitable. Living closer together has also allowed for night time games of charades, poker and of course ‘I Have Never’.
Our village has a small school, with just 12 people ranging from 5 to 13 years old, every day we have spent an hour teaching some basic English including ‘head, shoulders, knees and toes’’. We also held sports day which involved mixed teams of venturers, PMs and children running three-legged races, hopping with balloons between their legs and dancing under a limbo stick. We have also begun holding adult classes with the whole village fluent in no time!
Delta Yankee 5 has also been lucky enough to meet with some of the Alphas who are also working on a water project. Together we went on a trip to the nearby town of San Juan de la May where we visited a ceramics factory, some of the town’s 26 fat lady statues and slept over in a community centre.
With just a few days to go, we are all working hard to finish the project and look forward to a goodbye party in the village!

Monday, 11 April 2011

Alpha Yankee 3- Braulio Carillo- Photo Update

The New Home
Off to Work
 Bringing up the wood and rocks for the path
 Building the steps